fastcompany
fastcompany:

There are a lot of roads just sitting there in the sun, doing nothing with all that energy. Why not use them to collect it? Introducing the Solar Roadway, a road built out of solar panels. 
The road is made of three parts: a hard-wearing translucent top-layer with the solar cells, LED lights (for road markings) and a heating element (to keep off snow and ice); an electronics layer to control lighting and communications; and a base plate layer that distributes power to nearby homes and businesses (and perhaps electric vehicle charging stations). Plus, there’s a channel at the edge to collect and filter run-off water (including anti-freeze and other chemicals that normally leeches into the ground). 
More…

fastcompany:

There are a lot of roads just sitting there in the sun, doing nothing with all that energy. Why not use them to collect it? Introducing the Solar Roadway, a road built out of solar panels. 

The road is made of three parts: a hard-wearing translucent top-layer with the solar cells, LED lights (for road markings) and a heating element (to keep off snow and ice); an electronics layer to control lighting and communications; and a base plate layer that distributes power to nearby homes and businesses (and perhaps electric vehicle charging stations). Plus, there’s a channel at the edge to collect and filter run-off water (including anti-freeze and other chemicals that normally leeches into the ground). 

More…

vizual-statistix
vizual-statistix:

The U.S. Green Building Council publishes a directory of all LEED-certified public projects in the country. The data mapped here do not include residential projects. Not surprisingly, some states are much more focused on sustainable construction practices than others. On a per capita basis, VT, CO, OR, WA, and MD lead the way, with more than 100 LEED-certified projects per 1M state population. The six states below 25 projects per 1M state population are LA, WV, OK, MS, AL, and KY. Is the divide by political preference a coincidence?  I’ll let you decide…
Data source: http://www.usgbc.org/projects

vizual-statistix:

The U.S. Green Building Council publishes a directory of all LEED-certified public projects in the country. The data mapped here do not include residential projects. Not surprisingly, some states are much more focused on sustainable construction practices than others. On a per capita basis, VT, CO, OR, WA, and MD lead the way, with more than 100 LEED-certified projects per 1M state population. The six states below 25 projects per 1M state population are LA, WV, OK, MS, AL, and KY. Is the divide by political preference a coincidence?  I’ll let you decide…

Data source: http://www.usgbc.org/projects